Tips for presenters – How I met your mother style

A very stylish presentation by esPrezo aimed at helping you to grab your audiences attention in the first 60 seconds of your presentation.  The SlideShare gives you 6 tips:

  1. Personal story opener
  2. The energy opener
  3. Humour opener
  4. Question opener
  5. Situational opener
  6. Tricky opener

Which is your preferred way to start a presentation?

Hi, guys! I’m Barney. Barney Stinson. Stand up and look down at your feet, because I’m going to drop a little bit of wisdom on how to open up your presentations.

So just try it out it’s going to be legen…
how-to-pick-up-your-audience-28-638

…dary!

+Alesandra Blakeston

What is innovation?

I’ve been in my current role for 10 months now and have learned a lot about innovation as a result. One thing that I have noticed, is that there are many different definitions out there for innovation.  DBD International has one definition in the slideshare below, which really caught my eye.  Not only is it a great example of animation, it tells a great story and defines innovation easily and quickly!

Do you see the dots that other’s don’t see?

How would you define innovation?

+Alesandra Blakeston

The Future of Work

Just loving the bold bright design of this SlideShare by SprintBiz:

http://www.slideshare.net/SprintBiz/future-of-work-35928727

In addition to the great design, it has some really powerful messages:

  • When we go to work, we look for meaning; for autonomy; for recognition and affirmation.
  • And yes, for fun.
  • Only when you’ve hired the right people… Then – and only then – can you think about how to deploy new technology and to reinvent work
    • New collaboration tools can turbo-charge your teams.
    • New data, analytics and tracking tools can make you smarter.
    • Better tech can improve every process.
  • Change.  How well can you pivot?
  • Competition.  If they zig, can you zag?
  • Complexity.  Who will be the first to lighten up and simplify?
  • [It] always comes down to how well you engage your people.

What do you think?  Do you agree? +Alesandra Blakeston

Better PowerPoint – quick and dirty tips

Found this in my SlideShare feed this morning and loved it so much I had to share it!  Which is your favourite tip?

Personally – I always tweak existing decks to make new ones.  Why start from scratch if you don’t have to?

Great presentation deck!

+Alesandra Blakeston

40 going on 4

Believe it or not, I actually turn 40 this year.  I have more in common with some of my millennial friends than with the typical 40 year old woman, and yet all of my friends have been telling me that I am getting old or have asked me if it bothers me.  The truth?  No.  Not even slightly.  The fact is that in many, many ways, I am still around four years old.  Old enough to know better, but still young enough to get up to mischief  I still love super heroes (Avengers and X-Men anyone?), I still devour fantasy stories (The Hobbit, Labyrinth, Dark Crystal to name but a few) and I still love Disney (Little Mermaid, Frozen!!!).  Of course, I’ve learned a lot along the way.  I’ve been hurt, knocked down and bruised.  I’ve laughed, loved and soared high.  Frankly I wouldn’t change a thing – even the REALLY painful parts.  Since not everyone I know feels this way about themselves and their lives, I thought I would share my life lessons in the hopes that it will help not just them, but others too.

It seems as though I’ve always been little miss confident, little miss independent as you can see from the photos below.  Was this behaviour learned or inherited, I couldn’t say, you would probably have to ask my family.  I do know though that I was the first and only one in my family to go to university, the first to travel outside of Europe and the first to work abroad.  Confidence can be learned, failure embraced and learned from, and fear should be seen as a motivator.  If you’re not afraid, you are not challenging yourself enough!  Why do I say this?  I present to you my facts of life:

20140502_0947241. Children learn by making mistakes.  You learn to walk by falling, you learn to ride a bike by crashing.  This first photo shows me at the age of three checking to see if my parents are watching before I sneak off to climb my neighbour’s six foot brick wall.  Funnily, there are plenty of other similar photos of me.  I once was grounded for peddling my tricycle on the main road.  There was a long queue of traffic behind me, the first and foremost of which was a six wheeler flatbed truck.  Everyone in my street was watching the funny parade of traffic following this 3 / 4 year old child being honked and blared at by the impatient drivers.  When I eventually turned off onto my side street, the lorry driver pulled up to talk to my parents.  When he asked “Didn’t I hear him honking?”  My reply was simple. “I was peddling as fast as I could…”

I have to admit I don’t remember either of these stories actually happening, but my parents (and their friends) have told me these stories and others enough times that they (and I) are village legend.  As you can imagine, I used to scare the pants off my parents on a regular basis!  I never fell off that wall, but I am sure I fell off enough smaller walls to be confident enough to tackle the bigger one.  I’m sure you get the point I am making.  Dont’ be afraid of falling or of making mistakes. Instead, be afraid of not trying.  Life is very very boring if you play it safe!  Also, you’ll never be noticed by doing what everyone else does.

20140502_0946442. Find out what makes you special and own it!  Both of my parents worked when I was young.  It was necessary as my parents weren’t rich by any standard.  This of necessity made me independent.  I used to walk myself and my brother to school.  In the small village where we grew up, it was perfectly safe back then!  As a result, I learned responsibility young.  That being said, I distinctly remember hating the dresses I was put in to go to school.  One of the parents of a classmate of mine was a dressmaker and almost every girl in the village wore these dresses as they were of a good quality and inexpensive.  Of course, I was a tomboy and hated dresses on general principle.  The only way my mother could get me into the day’s dress was if it had the colour red in it.  (I still prefer that colour to any other).  We also compromised with my school coat.  It had to have big buttons, so that I could use it as a cape when playing G-Force or Wonder Woman in the playground.

Growing up in a family where we had very little and in a village where everyone was related and knew everyone else’s business made me determined to escape, to be better and to be different.  Luckily for me, my mother encouraged me to read and let me live and play in my fantasy world.  I was always making up stories and little fantasies where I would be the hero and save the day.  Now I work for a global corporation, and have done not one but two different secondments outside of the UK.  My job entails creativity and innovation (I get to play and teach games for a living) and being a thought leader.

That being said, I went through a horrible phase (both professionally and personally) in the early part of my career with the company.  Work and home felt like a battleground.  During that time, I was lost.  I lost sight of who I was and why I should care.  I felt mired in failure and thought I couldn’t do anything right.  Fortunately one or two amazing people mentored me and helped me to regain that self-confidence that I lost for a while. They saw potential in me and helped me to bring it out.  I won’t name them (they know who they are) but because of them, I was able to win a National Training Award for the company and for a short while flew with the stars.  It only seems fair to pay that gift forward.

The fact is that everyone has a gift.  Some more than one.  If I can help just one person find what makes them unique, special and help them to turn that gift into a talent that they can leverage, then I have done well.  One of my friends is going through a bad patch at the moment.  She’s lost faith in herself and doesn’t know which way to turn.  She’s trying to fit in and keep her head down.  I keep telling her that regardless of what others around her think and say, it’s her opinion of herself that should have the most weight.  Value yourself and others will value you too.  Being different worked for me as a child, and being different is what has made me successful as an adult.  The truly successful are unique and original.

3. Be proud of your connections and help them to develop.  As the eldest child of three brothers and sisters, I was forever hearing “Take your brother / sister with you!”  or my favourite, usually when my brother had done something stupid and of course, it was my fault,  “Why didn’t you stop him?  You know better!”  Regardless of whether I was popular or not at school (and for a while, I really wasn’t!), I always had someone tagging along.  I learned a lot about teaching and mentoring and it made me a better person because of it.  I learned patience with my brother who is three years younger than me and I learned teaching with my sister who is eight years younger than me.  When I was a teenager, she was just a little girl.  I taught her to avoid all the mistakes I made.  Now I do the same with the young people I mentor at work and the interns whom I employ.  I learned that being responsible for someone (being a leader) means looking out for their welfare and development as well as bossing them around (like big sisters do).  You have no idea how proud I am of my little brother and how far he has come, especially since the birth of his gorgeous little daughter…  I feel the same way about my interns.  There’s nothing like the pride you feel when you see someone you have encouraged succeed.  The bike in the photo below eventually became my brother’s.  Both of us started with stabilisers and eventually moved on to a bigger better bike (I eventually moved onto a motorbike – but that’s a whole other story!)

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4. You should never stop learning, regardless of your age.  Incidentally, I would never have gotten as good on social media and blogging if it weren’t for my younger friends helping me out and paying me back.  Just because you are older and wiser, it doesn’t mean you are better.  The younger generation has a lot to teach us about life in general (not just the latest tech and which apps you should have on your smartphone). Having a reverse mentor doesn’t just keep your outlook young, it can help you be more assertive and dare I say it more successful.  I belong to Generation X, but have Baby Boomers as friends as well as Millennials.  Believe it or not, I learned how to demand what I want from my job and my position from my millennial friends.  I learned diplomacy, tact and how to behave at work from my baby boomer friends.  No one knows everything, regardless of how old they are or how wise they are.  Being willing to change and adapt, understanding what to do with information, is more important in today’s world than being an expert.  Let’s face it, you can find anything you might wish to know with Google search.

20140502_0947165. Passion and Humour makes the day go faster.  This year, I will have worked for the company for fifteen years.  Strangely enough, that feels more like a milestone than my turning 40!  As a typical Brit, I am a master of sarcasm and wit (ask any one of my team!) and of course self-deprecating humour.  That doesn’t mean though that I don’t value myself or others.  In fact, the people that I am most fond of, usually get the most stick, myself included!  When preparing a facilitation session or a presentation, I always try to add in some fun and some jokes.  After all, if you can make people laugh, they are much more likely to remember you and by extension, your message.  After 15 years I have hundreds of co-workers (or should I say co-conspirators?), many with the same irreverent sense of humour, and I think  I have stayed so long because the company believes in its people and doesn’t take itself too seriously.  We’re passionate about what we do and it shows.  Frankly, if you can’t be passionate about your subject, then stop talking!  My blog is chock full of tips and techniques, musings and inspirations.  Above all though, it is about things that I am passionate about, whether that’s developing people, innovation, simplifying difficult topics, Excel charts or PowerPoint presentations.  As a child I grew up knowing that I was an odd little duck – my blog (and my twitter feed) is no different.  But I was given this advice by an old friend who mothered me on more than one occasion.

Stick out your tongue, tell the world to get in line, be good to your friends and march to your own tune!

Don’t you agree?

+Alesandra Blakeston

Who am I: Innovation Program Manager

A few weeks ago the communication department of the company I work for posted a soundbite video of me and how I’ve moved to the United States. This week, they are posting a video on what I do in terms of innovation.  You can watch it on YouTube below.  Hope you like it!

Enjoy!

+Alesandra Blakeston

Intern Advice

A colleague of mine has recently passed her 40th work anniversary. That’s an amazing 40 years working for the same company. As part of our women’s network, she was asked to give her advice to new young women joining the company. Very inspiring stuff. In fact, it inspired me to pass on some life learning to my interns. Here goes…

  1. If plan A doesn’t work, the alphabet has 25 more letters! Stay cool – Claire Cook
  2. Life is either a #DaringAdventure or nothing – Helen Keller
  3. Don’t be afraid of being #Different. Be afraid of being the same as everyone else – Unknown
  4. #Don’tCompare your chapter 1 to someone else’s chapter 20.  Everyone was a beginner at some point – Unknown
  5. If you are working on something #exciting that you really care about, you don’t have to be pushed.  The vision pulls you – Steve Jobs

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Hope these inspire you!

+Alesandra Blakeston

5 apps to help your creativity

I must admit I don’t know where I would be without my iPad.  It’s ridiculous, but there it is.  Everything important in my life is on there, so it should come as no surprise that I even have creativity apps to help me in my role as an Innovation Program Manager.  What apps do I use, I hear you ask?  In no particular order, here are my top 5:

oflow 2Thinking differently – Oflow by Tanner Christensen

Created to help you get unstuck anytime, oflow is the only app of its kind to offer hundreds of proven creativity techniques on both iPhone and iPad.

This app is designed to help kick start your thinking when it gets stuck in a rut.  I particularly like the “Focus on the Process” tool, which helps me to challenge the status quo more, the “Forget about Perfection” tool and the “Fake It” tool.

The app has over 150 tips / tools to help get the creative juices flowing and you can even simply shake the iPad / iPhone to see a new tip / tool.  It is integrated with Evernote as well, which really helps when you want to share your work between your iPad and your work laptop!

Note: I also use Creative Whack Pack by Creative Think with similar results

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mind toolsManagement / Productivity Tools – Mind tools by MindTools.com

Learn more than 100 management, business and personal productivity skills from the MindTools.com toolkit. Build useful skills whenever you have a spare moment.

Skill types include leadership, team management, strategy, problem solving, decision-making, project management, time management and personal productivity, stress management, communication, creativity and career development.

Whilst not strictly a creativity tool, this app has a lot to offer and I use it a lot.  It helps me to track the various projects I have ongoing as well as teach me new tools to use.  I particularly like the short summaries which give the bare bones for improving a set skill.  Of course, there is a search function as well if there is a specific tool you want to use.  I love the leadership section as well as the project management section.
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innovateNews app – Innovate by Geoff Zoeckler

Looking to spark some creativity or need some inspiration for a new idea? Scroll through this app to connect quickly with some of the world’s best innovation articles, conversations, videos, and news reports. All information is updated in real time as the information is published.

Combines blog feeds from several sources: Braden Kelley’s Innovation, SEEK company, TED videos and podcasts, Accidental Creative podcasts, Innovation conversations on twitter and articles from Business week and Fast Company all in the same app!  It’s my go to source for all things innovation on the web and often brings me the news first!

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Idea SketchDiagrams & Mind Mapping – Idea Sketch by Nosleep Software

Idea Sketch lets you easily draw a diagram – mind map, concept map, or flow chart – and convert it to a text outline, and vice versa. You can use Idea Sketch for anything, such as brainstorming new ideas, illustrating concepts, making lists and outlines, planning presentations, creating organizational charts, and more!

I love this app.  Whilst I also love Paper by 53, iA Writer and of course iDraw, Idea Sketch can convert text from other apps and import it into Idea Sketch to create an idea automatically.  It is really simple to create mind maps as well as flow charts and outlines.  Finally, all of my ideas can be uploaded from here to DropBox or my SkyDrive.  I’ve also played with Grafio Lite, which is quite similar.

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123D SculptPrototyping ideas – 123D Sculpt by Autodesk

The most fun you can have sculpting without getting your hands dirty!

I adore this app.  It has a multitude of features for the advanced users and for the novices, you can start with the existing library of creatures, humans, vehicles etc.  You then push and pull and paint to make the sculpture you want.  It is loads of fun!  I particularly like the fact that you can take snapshots and so create animated movies, which can then be uploaded to YouTube.  The images are even transparent.  Also by Autodesk are 123D Catch, 123D Creature 123D Design and 123D Make.

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What do you think?  Are there any other apps that you use for creativity?

+Alesandra Blakeston

Building a PLN

Loved this presentation by Sylvia Rosenthal Tolisano.  I have a Personal Learning Network and have had one for many years.  I learn from those both younger and older than me as well as via blogs, SlideShares, videos and images.  As Sylvia says:

Your PLN is no longer tied to your zip code and you no longer work in isolation. Collaboration no longer just means to work with a colleague in your building. You are able to connect to educators from around the world who are ready and willing to teach beyond the walls of their own classroom.

The internet has made learning so much easier and allowed me to personalise my learning experience, making it more efficient.  What about you?  Do you have a PLN?  Who do you learn from?

+Alesandra Blakeston